Placemaking Opportunities

Funding Opportunities, Placemaking Resources

Seems that everyone wants great places and why not? Interactive, well-designed community spaces that are welcoming and engaging for all people. Those are just some of the goals of successful placemaking. Here are some resources that celebrate or help with your potential placemaking projects.

  • Association of Indiana Municipalities (AIM) Annual AwardsPlacemaking (and others, too!)

The Placemaking Award recognizes a project that demonstrates the positive impact of planning, regeneration, urban design or economic development work on the physical quality of a place, as well as the economic and social well-being of a community. Nominations must have a physical aspect.

Follow the link below for more information.

https://aimindiana.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/2017-Annual-Awards-Brochure.pdf

  • Open Scene Creative Placemaking Consultancy

If your community participated in the Indiana Arts Commission’s From The Ground Up creative placemaking workshop, you may be eligible for a consultancy opportunity. This consultancy can help get a community’s art/creative placemaking project no matter what stage it is in.

http://in.gov/arts/cptoolkit/2371.htm

  • Historic Places Grants

Grant funding supports long-term public programs to interpret historic houses, districts, or neighborhoods, such as interpretive plans, site-specific exhibitions or signage, and living history programs. The deadline for this grant opportunity is August 9, 2017. To explore further, check out the guidelines and other guidance on the Public Humanities Projects page.

  • Kaboom! Playground Grants

Sign up to receive emails about various grant opportunities to fund playgrounds and other play equipment in your community.

https://kaboom.org/grants/non_kaboom?utm_source=170606&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=grantalerts&utm_content=cta

  • Creative Placemaking Discussion

The Indianapolis Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) office is hosting a Creative Placemaking discussion on July 11 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at The Platform, 202 E. Market Street, Indianapolis, IN.

The discussion will include a panel of leaders who have been driving the initiative in neighborhoods throughout Indianapolis and Cincinnati. We will also hear from national leaders who will further discuss opportunities and lessons for the role arts and culture play in economic development. Sign up here.

  • Creative Placemaking Summit 3

#Lansingplacemakers are hosting Creative Placemaking Summit 3 on October 11, 2017 in Lansing, MI. Find out about creative placemaking, why you should be doing it, how you can do it, and who is already doing it. Visit their website for more information: http://www.lansingplacemakers.org/

 

Revitalization of a True American City: Gary, Indiana

City Planning, Community Spotlight, Funding Opportunities, News and Upcoming Events, Uncategorized

Many downtowns in Indiana have become run-down, underutilized, and in distress in the past 70 years. Perhaps one of the most well-known in this category is Gary, Indiana. Located on the northwest corner of Indiana along Lake Michigan and 30 miles from Chicago, Gary is often associated with a run-down downtown, a declining population and loss of jobs in the area. The flip side of this though, and one which the current leaders in Gary are attempting to capture, is the incredible amount of opportunity for rebirth and revitalization within the area.

gary-pic-2

Gary is working towards capturing the history of their downtown and showcasing it for visitors as well. Source.

The Gary Preservation Tour is the newest addition to Patronicity’s CreatINg Places project list. Three different projects have been funded in the last two months with a collaboration from crowdfunding and matching grants from IHCDA, including the Pre-Enactment Theater! This Preservation Tour will take place during the summer of 2017 over the course of three days and includes two days of walking tours which will lead visitors through the history of Gary present in the downtown. The Associate City Planner of Gary, Alex Koerner, has sited different buildings which will be on the tour including “City Hall, Union Station, the Gary Land Co. building in Gateway Park, and the Hotel Gary (now called Genesis Towers)” (Source). The last day will be an open house where everyone is invited to come to Gary and explore the city at their leisure using volunteers and new wayfinding signage to guide themselves around downtown.

The money raised by crowdfunders through Patronicity and matched by IHCDA will help pay for securing key historic buildings in the downtown, improving the aesthetic of Broadway Street with banners, and paying for costs during the event in the summer.

gary-pic-1_compressed

One of Gary’s goals is to preserve historic buildings in order to later restore them including this 100 year old Methodist Church. Source. 

Gary has an even more comprehensive goal than getting people downtown for a couple days during the summer to admire some of their historic buildings—they are coupling the walking tours with events going on in Gary to get people to stick around and check out what Gary has to offer including baseball games, restaurants, and arts festivals. Connecting people to the place they are living is an extremely important part of this endeavor as is the walking part of the walking tour.

In the summer of 2016, a study came out done by the Arup group out of London called Cities Alive, Toward a Walking World which shows in detail how designing cities for pedestrians over cars has immense benefits in every area of a city’s health and the health of its citizens. It also includes an incredible amount of case studies backing this up. Some of the reasons they outlined can be used to substantiate Gary’s process and goals and show how increasing Gary’s walkability factor can increase their attraction as a stable Indiana community.

“If you plan cities for cars and traffic, you get cars and traffic. If you plan for people and place, you get people and places” – Fred Kent, Project for Public Spaces

More walkable streets improve a city by:

  • Bringing back “eyes on the street”
    • A cheap way to make people feel safe on the streets.
  • Making neighborhoods more vibrant
    • Walking around a place which was built for people will bring people back multiple times and encourage them to spend more time in these areas.
  • Enhancing “sense of place”
    • Increases people’s sense of civic responsibility to take care of a distinct place.
  • Fostering social interaction
    • New people will get to meet each other!
  • Improving a city’s brand and identity
    • Making a city more walkable makes it more livable and making a city more livable makes more people want to visit.
  • Increasing tourism
    • See above.
  • Activating the street façade
    • Walkable cities will also have less vacant storefronts and more foot traffic in those stores.
  • Inspiring civic responsibility
    • It is much harder to pass up issues which you see while walking around than while driving— a walkable city encourage individuals to come together and advocate for each other.
  • Helping make cities more resilient
    • Crises which affect cities that are dependent on the automobile or other forms of transit will have less of an effect on cities that are more walkable.
  • Being a tool for urban regeneration
    • People walking around a neighborhood or the downtown connect with other individuals in the area, and then become more invested in that area and motivated to act. That’s when change happens within cities and communities.

To see more of these examples, visit this article!

gary-pic-3_compressed

Walkability is not only good for revitalizing communities, it increases individual’s physical health, economic wealth, and overall environmental health. Source. 

This is just a small portion of what effects encouraging and showcasing walkability in a community like Gary can have on the immediate and surrounding areas. Showing the public that Gary is investing in its core downtown, revitalizing distinct and beautiful core buildings, and building the place up for people, will give people renewed hope for Gary’s future and drive to be part of the exciting change currently happening there.

The best thing you can do for Gary is to go home and say four nice things about it.” – Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson.

I would add that another good thing you can do for Gary is to go walk around it.

To learn more about Gary’s Preservation Tour or to donate to their cause, visit their page on Patronicity‘s website, or go to their Facebook page!

Main Photo Source: Gary Preservation Tour

Visualizing a Just, Equitable, and Vibrant Neighborhood for the Monon 16

Community Spotlight, Funding Opportunities, News and Upcoming Events, Placemaking Resources

Pre-Enactment Theater in Indianapolis

harrison-center_pic3_compressed

Bird’s eye view looking east on E 16th St. at the Oaks Academy Middle School.

The Harrison Center for the Arts opened in 2000 at 16th and Delaware in the Old Northside neighborhood. This neighborhood, like many others in Indianapolis, had taken a hit since its prime around the turn of the century, when President Benjamin Harrison lived in and was involved with the neighborhood. Since 2000, the Harrison Center has expanded their sphere of influence and had a positive impact on the neighborhood, by hosting gallery shows, outdoor concerts, offering studio spaces, and creating Herron High School in 2004. Now, with the help of Patronicity, the general public, and the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA), they are embarking on a completely new initiative—community engagement and planning for the future through visioning strategies and a strategy dubbed “pre-enactment”: bringing a community’s hope for their future to life.

“Pre-Enactment envisions a just, equitable and vibrant neighborhood where everyone is included in economic prosperity.  Rather than dwelling on the past through “re-enactment”, we will “pre-enact” a new, vibrant commercial corridor that serves as hope for the future. The 12-month-long series of community visioning sessions and creative placemaking activities along 16th Street will culminate in a huge, day-long public event on October 7, 2017” (The Harrison Center for the Arts).

The Harrison Center is dissatisfied with the disinvestment, high vacancy rates of both homes and commercial buildings, high unemployment rate, poverty issues and poor levels of education which are present in their neighborhood. They are motivated to change these aspects of their community and show the rest of the neighborhood what the area has the potential to become using “temporary and permanent improvements to the physical structures to depict a healthy neighborhood”.

harrison-center_pic2

Harrison Center for the Arts theater students will set up pop-up storefronts and activities to show neighbors the potential of the neighborhood. Source: Vimeo video

 

By including people from the Harrison Center for the Arts who are already invested in the neighborhood in the visioning efforts of the community, they will build a base of people to follow through with the efforts to permanently revitalize the neighborhood and directly involve neighbors who might not be inclined to get involved otherwise. This Indianapolis-based model of creative placemaking and neighborhood revitalization will be the first of its kind and could have far-reaching impacts around the country, showcasing a new, innovative way to enact change at the neighborhood level. Bringing together theater, the arts, pop-up establishments and community engagement with neighborhood and economic revitalization is a unique approach to issues which plague almost every city in the U.S.

This project is also unique because it is being funded through crowdgranting. The Detroit-based site, Patronicity, is currently hosting three other Indiana projects (in Greensburg, South Bend and Wabash) which are being funded in the same way as well as projects in Michigan and Massachusetts. The Pre-Enactment Theater in Indianapolis has a goal of $50,000 which will then be matched dollar for dollar by IHCDA. Their deadline is in 8 days, on February 15th, and they have just over $13,000 to go! If you feel intrigued and excited about this project or organization, make sure you go to the Pre-Enactment Theater’s page on Patronicity’s website and donate to their cause! Don’t forget to keep up with the Harrison Center for the Arts as they continue their efforts in the Old Northside neighborhood!

Read more about the project and watch a video explaining the process here.

Main photo source: Pre-Enactment Theater is coming to Monon 16! 

Indianapolis Duo Awarded $200k Placemaking Grant From ArtPlace America

Community Spotlight, News and Upcoming Events
us_demo.png

Phyllis Viola Boyd and LaShawnda Crowe Storm of Indianapolis’ The House Poem Project. (photos by artists)

This past week, “RECLAIM,” a project that focuses on tackling unsafe neighborhood conditions on Indianapolis’ northwest side, was the recipient of a $200k grant from ArtPlace America’s 2016 National Creative Placemaking Fund.

Placemaking Grant Opportunity: Southwest Airlines Heart of the Community

Funding Opportunities, Tactical Urbanism
spark-overview-800x500

Spark on Monument Circle, organized by Big Car Collaborative and the City Market. – photo Tony Valainis, Indianapolis Monthly

Do you have an idea to make Indianapolis an even better city in which to live, work, and play, but need money to make it happen?  Then the Southwest Airline’s Heart of the Community grant may be the missing piece to your placemaking financing puzzle!

Knight Cities Challenge 2016

Funding Opportunities, News and Upcoming Events

What’s Your Best Idea to Make Gary and Fort Wayne More Successful?

This past year, the Delta Institute was awarded $385,000 from the Knight Foundation’s Cities Challenge to establish a facility in Gary, IN that would deconstruct and reclaim building materials from vacant homes that were past the point of no return.

In partnership with the City of Gary, the Steel City Salvage pilot program aims to keep reusable material out of city landfills, redirect those materials for use in projects in and around Gary, and create local jobs in the process.

Once again, the Knight Foundation’s Cities Challenge is seeking applications from across the nation that will help make their 26 cities more vibrant places to live and work. Knight will award grants from a pool of $5 million for innovative and effective ideas that focus on talent attraction/retention, economic opportunity development, and community engagement.

While ideas can come from anyone, located anywhere, they must benefit one or more of the aforementioned 26 Knight communities. In Indiana, these would be either Gary or Fort Wayne.

The application process is currently underway and concludes at noon ET on Thursday, November 3, 2016. Don’t worry if your idea isn’t presentation ready.  The initial application asks just three primary questions about your idea that should be answered in 100 words or less.

For more information and how to apply, please visit knightcities.org.

Crowdgranting: Letting the Public Choose

Funding Opportunities, News and Upcoming Events

Joint Effort Between the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority and Patronicity Allows Hoosiers to Help Select and Fund Placemaking Projects in Their Communities

creating_places_logo_final-0816

Are you interested in creating vibrant places in your community? If you are, please let me introduce you to Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority’s (IHCDA) new funding program, CreatINg Places.

Tools for Community Improvement

City Planning, Funding Opportunities
riverfront-crossings-2

Image: Smart Growth America

Smart Growth America, a Washington D.C. based advocacy organization for “people who want to live and work in great neighborhoods” is currently accepting applications for free technical assistance workshops to help local leaders and residents make their communities more livable, sustainable, and vibrant.

Now in its sixth year, Smart Growth America’s free technical assistance program has helped more than 50 communities grow in ways that benefit residents and businesses alike, while preserving a sense of place. Applicants can apply for one of the following tools:

  • Implementing smart growth 101
  • Planning for economic and fiscal health
  • Fiscal impact analysis
  • Sustainable land use code audit
  • Complete Streets technical assistance
  • Parking audits
  • Cool planning: local strategies to slow climate change
  • Using LEED-ND to accelerate the development of sustainable communities
  • (Re)Building Downtown

Click here to learn more about Smart Growth America’s free technical assistance.


Also, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has issued a Call for Applications for its 2017 Culture of Health Prize, an annual program that honors outstanding community efforts and partnerships that are helping live healthier lives.

rwjf_logo_stack_261u65_1

As many as ten communities that have placed a priority on the health and well being of its residents, especially those facing the greatest challenges, will be awarded a $25,000 cash prize and have their stories and successes celebrated broadly to inspire other towards locally-driven change.

Click here to learn more about the 2017 Culture of Health Prize.